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Employment Law for Employers

Employees are the most valuable asset at most companies. While there are rare cases in which a business has a technological advantage over its competitors, most often companies are successful because of the hard work of their employees.

At Wolcott Rivers Gates, our business law attorneys work with employers to develop programs that reward and retain employees; for example, ownership interests with certain protections for the employer and non-solicitation or non-compete agreements so the employee cannot leave and steal the employer’s customers upon termination.

Our team can also assist you with:

  • Drafting employment contracts that reward the company’s top performers and protect the company from unfounded claims by disgruntled employees.
  • Assisting in the creation of an employee handbook that allows the employer to convey important information to its employees and limit any potential liability for discrimination claims.

Employment law is one area where an employer's good deed can come back to haunt the company. We can help to develop policies that avoid or minimize such claims. If current or former employees bring claims, we can also assist in defending those claims. Currently, federal and state governments try to force companies to treat individuals as employees rather than independent contractors. Our firm can structure a relationship to respond to that pressure.

When things do go awry, our lawyers are well-equipped to face any employee dispute or government-filed complaint involving:

  • Employment contracts

  • Employment relations, including hiring and firing

  • Non-solicitation (noncompete) agreements

  • Unemployment compensation

  • Family Medical Leave Act

  • Americans With Disabilities Act

  • OSHA compliance

  • Workers’ compensation

  • Title VII compliance

  • Discrimination compliance

  • Title IX compliance

  • Employee handbooks

  • Litigation

  • Drug and alcohol testing

  • Federal wage and hour laws