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Guardianship / Conservatorship

People unable to care for themselves or make informed decisions are vulnerable to financial predators. In some cases, they can even be a danger to themselves.

Guardianship and conservatorship allow trusted and qualified caregivers to gain authority to handle medical and financial affairs of loved ones in need of assistance; examples include an elderly relative who suffers from dementia or Alzheimers; a disabled person with a traumatic brain injury; or a child coming of age with a congenital mental condition. No matter the situation, guardianship and conservatorship allow loved ones to step in to secure finances and assure proper medical treatment and supervision whether at home or in a proper residential facility.

The protections afforded to the incapacitated person through guardianship and conservatorship are superior to that of a power of attorney. Guardianships and conservatorships are judicial proceedings that require court appointment of a person found suitable by the court to maintain those positions. A commissioner of accounts monitors the funds on an annual basis, and a surety bond is required to safeguard the incapacitated person’s funds.

If you believe a loved one requires a guardianship or conservatorship, let us evaluate the situation and, where appropriate, guide you through the process.